Compound and Complex Sentences

Background Information:

A clause is a group of words within a sentence that includes a subject and a verb. A phrase is a group of related words within a sentence that does not have both a subject and a verb. Embedding is when a phrase or sentence becomes part of another sentence, serving key grammatical functions (Owens, pg 329).

Clauses and phrases are the most advanced method of language sophistication known to man. With them, a sentence can theoretically be made to communicate anything that can be thought (Pinker, 1995). The existence of clauses and phrases manages to both greatly enrich our communication possibilities while often making effective communication more difficult. Expanded sentences are commonly understood as those which include additional information, such as modifiers or negation, but are not as sophisticated as sentences with clauses or phrases.

Because complexity is increased by adding words within and near clauses and phrases, and because of the difficulty in comparing order of acquisition across categories (e.g. negatives, pronouns, etc.), clause and phrase hierarchies should be manipulated based on the individual needs of the student. A student with difficulty understanding negatives should work on clauses and phrases that include negatives.

We call clauses that are missing words elliptical clauses. For example, “The boy I met was named Fred.” instead of “The boy that I met was named Fred.” Elliptical clauses are common, and especially in oral speech, are often easier to understand. Compound and complex sentences occur when sentences combine independent and/or dependent clauses. Complex sentences are often used to show that one idea takes precedence over another. Compound sentences are often used to show that two ideas are of equal importance. While nearly all assessments contain directions with at least some clauses and phrases, the PLS, CASL, CELF, and OWLS are among the assessments that directly assess production of these structures.

Prerequisites: relative pronouns (that, which, who, what) for relative clauses; specific structures for others (nouns for noun phrases, infinitives for infinitive phrases, prepositions for prepositional phrases, etc.)

Compound and Complex Sentence Information and Activities

Click on picture to view a small preview of each activity. Click on Doc or PDF to download worksheets in preferred format.

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)

(1) Intro/ Examples  Doc PDF;     (2) Scripts/Drill/ Guided Practice (2 pages)  PDF;          (3) Guided Practice (2 pages) Doc PDF;        (4) Embedding/Functional Doc PDF;     (5) Guided Practice Doc PDF;     (6) Practice Pictures Doc PDF

Relative Clause Activities

 Click on picture to view a small preview of each activity. Click on Doc or PDF to download worksheets in preferred format.

(1)(2)(3)(4)

(1) Relative Clause ID Basic – Doc PDF;     (2) Relative Clause ID Expanded 1 Doc PDF;     (3) Relative Clause ID Expanded 2 Doc PDF;     (4) Relative Clause Worksheet Basic and Expanded Doc PDF

 Additional Activities

Click on picture to view a small preview of each activity. Click on Doc or PDF to download worksheets in preferred format.

(1)complex-oval-sentences-1(2)complex-oval-sentences-2 (3) sentence-combining-4 (4)embedding-activity-52

(1) Sentence Combining Oval 1:  Doc PDF ;      (2) Sentence Combining Oval 2:   Doc PDF;         (3) Sentence Combining Activity:  Doc PDF;      (4) Sentence Embedding Activity:  Doc PDF

Sentence Searches and Bullseyes

Click on picture to view a small preview of each activity. Click on Doc or PDF to download worksheets in preferred format.

(1) complex-sentence-search-3 (2)  (3)  (4) (5)  (6)  (7)  (8)

(1) Sentence Search 1 Doc PDF;    (2) Sentence Search 2 Doc PDF;    (3) Sentence Search 3 Doc PDF;    (4) Sentence Search 4  Doc PDF;     (5) Bullseye 1 Doc PDF;    (6) Bullseye 2 Doc PDF;    (7) Bullseye 3 Doc PDF;    (8) Bullseyes 4 Doc PDF

10 Responses to Compound and Complex Sentences

  1. no coment but i dont understand

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  2. W. Austin says:

    I love the sentence wheeels! Will be sharing them with teachers in my school here in the Caribbean.

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  3. Pingback: Welcome to Free Language Stuff! « Free Language Stuff

  4. Anonymous says:

    Great worksheets. Very user friendly, great composition (not crowded) and a variety of ideas. A real good site.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    What great worksheets… what fun!!

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  6. Outstanding!! Thank you soo much for all your hard work! You ROCK!!

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  7. A middle school Language Arts teacher says:

    Love the hierarchy model! However, “after school” is a prepositional phrase, not a dependent clause. A phrase does not build complexity into the sentence structure. The example “She opened her backpack after school” is a simple sentence. Phrases do not create complex sentences. In order to be complex, the sentence must contain at least one dependent clause and an independent clause.

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  8. Honda says:

    Are there any answers to these worksheets?

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  9. Paul says:

    No, sorry, for the most part I haven’t had time to do answer sheets.

    Like

  10. Anonymous says:

    Thank you your pages give me lots of ideas on workstations that can be used throughout the year, thanks!

    Like

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