Verbs and Verb Tense

Example of Verb Tense Developmental Order

Early Developing

“-ing” verbs: present participles such as eating, running, drawing; “-ed” verbs: regular past tense verbs such as played, opened; “-s” verbs: third person, regular present tense verbs such as walks, eats

Later Developing

future tense: will play, will be playing, can play tomorrow, going to play (“gonna” play), will soon be playing, irregular past tense: ate, ran, drew, taught, kept, spoke, thought, heard, etc.

Advanced

verb phrase with one auxiliary verb: various tenses such as can eat, am walking, were eating, will eat, have been, have gone, etc.

verb phrase with two or more auxiliary verbs: future tense and perfect tenses (past, present, or future) such as should be eating, could have been eating, would have wanted to be, had been playing, etc.

Basic Verb Tense Worksheets and Activities

Previews – Click on picture to view a small preview of each activity.

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)(7)(8)(9)(10)verb tense matching ed ing(11)passive voice matching

 

 Documents – Click on Doc or PDF to download worksheets in preferred format.

(1) Verb Tense Picture Activity Doc PDF;     (2) Basic Past Tense ID Doc PDF;     (3) Basic Present Tense ID Doc PDF;     (4) Basic Tense Pictures Doc PDF;     (5) Basic Tense ID Sentences Doc PDF;     (6) Regular Past Tense (-ed) Doc PDF;     (7) Present and Past Tense (-ed and -ing) Doc PDF;     (8) -ed -ing contrast cards 1 Doc PDF;     (9) -ed -ing contrast cards 2 Doc PDF;     (10) verb tense matching – ed/ing Doc PDF;      (11) passive voice matching Doc PDF

Subject-Verb Agreement Activities

Previews – Click on picture to view a small preview of each activity.

(1) (2) (3) (4)  (5) (6)

Documents – Click on Doc or PDF to download worksheets in preferred format.

(1) Subject-Verb Agreement Fill in the Blanks – Basic Doc PDF;     (2) S-V Agreement Fill in the Blanks 2 Doc PDF;     (3) S-V Agreement Fill in the Blanks 3 Doc PDF;     (4) S-V Agreement Sentence Drop 1 Doc PDF;     (5) S-V Agreement Sentence Drop 2 Doc PDF;     (6) S-V Agreement Sentence Maze  Doc PDF

Expanded and Later Developing Verb Tense Activities

Previews – Click on picture to view a small preview of each activity.

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)  (7) (8)(9) (10)  (11) (12) (13) (14)

Documents – Click on Doc or PDF to download worksheets in preferred format.

(1) Expanded Verb Tense Pictures Doc PDF;     (2) Board Games/Etc. Doc PDF;     (3) Functional/Extra Doc PDF;    (4) Varied Tense Sentence Search Doc PDF;     (5) Future Tense Sentence Search Doc PDF;     (6) Expanded Verb Tense Sentence Search 1  Doc PDF;     (7) Expanded Verb Tense Sentence Search 2 Doc PDF;     (8) Varied Verb Tense Sentence Maze Doc PDF;      (9) Expanded Verb Tense Sentence Maze 1 Doc PDF;     (10) Expanded Verb Tense Sentence Maze 2 Doc PDF;     (11) Varied Verb Tense Sentence Drop Doc PDF;     (12) Future Tense Sentence Drop Doc PDF;     (13) Varied Tense Bullseye Doc PDF;     (14) Varied Tense Bullseye 2 Doc PDF

Verb Tense Teaching Information

Tense allows us to more effectively communicate information related to when something occurs, occurred, or will occur, as well as more effectively understand if the occurrence has been completed, is in progress, or will occur continuously. The inference of tense is a frequent method of language simplification. When an adult asks, “What did you do at school today?” and

a child answers “Play with my friends,” the inference is that the event has already occurred. Normally developing children acquire aspects of tense production, such as the –ed morpheme, that allow them to avoid potential confusion resulting from tense omission.

In the English language, tense co-occurs with aspect, which concerns the description of an event relative to its completion, repetition, or continuing duration. Different languages use various techniques to express differences in tense. Latinate languages, in particular, use a variety of morphological endings to express when something happens (Crystal, pg 196). English only uses three: the –s, –ed, and -ing endings. Other tenses are communicated through irregular forms, auxiliary verbs, and adverbs.

Verb tense overlaps with many language skills, such as subject-verb agreement, production of infinitive verbs, irregular past tense, question formation, and helping verbs. Research suggests that omission of tense marker (“zero marking”) is the most prevalent kind of tense error in children with SLI (Marchman, Wulfeck, Weimer, 1999). Tests that assess for verb tense include the OWLS, CASL, CELF, CELF, and SPELT tests.

Verb Tense Elicitation Ideas

Verb Tense Goal Suggestions

Emily will identify verbs with age appropriate tense when presented with pictures with contrasting foils. For example, “Which picture shows, ‘He walked to school,’ rather than, ‘He is walking to school.’?”

Walt will use age appropriate verb tense in sentences when given a verb or verb phrase. For example, “Use the verb phrase ‘could have’ in a sentence.”

14 Responses to Verbs and Verb Tense

  1. ani says:

    it’s very helpful!

    Like

  2. Jodi says:

    these previews are way to small to see at all even when I click to zoom in on my computer….

    Like

  3. Anonymous says:

    This is a GREAT site for language teachers!
    The concept for the design of the activity sheets is very creative!

    Thank you ; thank you!!

    Like

  4. Anonymous says:

    I do appreciate the lists you have in each language category. I would like an explanation of age/grade correlation to Functional, Later Developing, and Advance groupings of words.

    Like

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  6. Anonymous says:

    Thank you, thank you for all the useful and creative ideas!!

    Like

  7. Gina Mayani says:

    I like it

    Like

  8. Anonymous says:

    Thank you, very helpful.

    Like

  9. elide says:

    this sucks just give us some verb tense sentences is it so had to ask for it

    Like

  10. Anonymous says:

    Thanks, very helpful!

    Like

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  13. Anonymous says:

    Thank you for sharing! Very helpful!

    Like

  14. vtejeda says:

    THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU! God bless you

    Like

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